Qualification and Learning Outcomes

Qualification

As a graduate you will be qualified to pursue doctoral studies or employment with national and international governmental and non-governmental institutions dealing with migration, intercultural competence, and education, namely intersecting with development issues and/or gender issues.

Teaching Methods

EMMIR embraces a broad understanding of migration and, consequently, of migration studies. Considering migration a cross-cutting research subject relevant in a range of different disciplines, the programme welcomes applicants from the social sciences and cultural studies, but also from educational sciences, linguistics, development studies, history, economics, law and journalism. This, then, has considerable implications for the programme’s teaching approach and learning methods.

 

Teaching in EMMIR first of all takes into account the diverse composition of the student group. Accordingly, an important starting point for each edition is the query of your experiences and expectations (academic, professional, personal, cultural) – also allowing teaching staff to adapt to the group of students.

 

Critical expertise

Focusing on theories, history, and methods/methodologies alike, teaching in EMMIR consistently aims at encouraging you to define your interests more closely and precisely, and is supposed to support you mapping your very individual ways to navigate the programme.

 

The diverse composition of the group and the variety of knowledges, experiences, and value systems available are considered precious resources – this diversity allows to constantly reflect processes and forms of knowledge production and to critically assess theories of inter-, multi-, and transculturality. Hence, expert knowledge is systematically connected to an explicit peer learning approach, also including peer feedback elements.

 

Personalized learning path

Teachers apply a variety of teaching forms and didactical approaches; rarely organised in the form of lectures, you meet in seminars and tutorials, workshops, and independent learner groups; the curriculum is subdivided into mandatory core teaching and elective classes.

 

You work both in the full group and in differently composed small groups; you have to fulfil individual assignments as well as group assignments; while the tasks and assignments vary according to the learning outcomes of a specific module, they have in common the aim to enhance problem-solving skills and the ability of multidirectional knowledge transfers.

Recognition

Since 2011, the programme runs under the European label of excellence, Erasmus Mundus. It is fully accredited and graduates will be awarded a joint degree by the seven EMMIR partner universities. By the end of 2017, five cohorts have graduated with a success rate of nearly 100%.

Learning Outcomes

In the current globalising labour market, expertise in migration and in­tercultural relations in combination with a bi-/multilingual profile and experience in the field offers chances for employment on in­ternational as well as national level, namely research, teaching, administra­tion, media, coordination and management in gov­ernmental and non-governmental organi­sations. In order to train for self-motivation and problem-solving skills, the didactics of EMMIR are built around the idea that young professionals need:

 

  • State of the art, in-depth-knowledge in their field and the abil­ity to critically reflect on their perspective and position in the field.
  • The tools to present and negotiate, to apply and to con­ceptualize, to cooperate, administrate and to manage. 

In cooperation with numerous actors and institutions in the field, you will gather experience actively linking the study programme and your own specialisa­tion. EMMIR applies reflexive didactics to ensure you get a combination of academic skills and core competences specific to migration studies and inter/transcultural studies with horizontal skills, in­cluding professional tools required in the labour market segments graduates seek employment in.

Peer Learning

The centre of knowledge exchange of this didactical approach is group work in research teams, classroom discussions, presentation days, and tutorials. Learning is understood as a cooperative task in formal and informal contexts. The interaction among students to attain educational goals, self-organisation and self-motivation are of central concern.

 

The above relies on a considerable amount of time and motivation for directed reading and self-studies, both considered core dimensions of graduate study. One of the key resources is the specialised EMMIR library (more than 1,000 pertinent and recent books). You do moreover have the possibility to immediately acquire even the latest publications (books and other media) for your semester work.

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Last modified: 2018-04-08